Mapping Species Distributions

SLIME MOLDS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA


Dog's vomit (Fuligo septica), photo by May Kald, identification confirmed by Michael Beug/Terry Taylor.

Slime molds are fungus-like organisms that were once classified in the same Kingdom as fungi. Like fungi, they reproduce by spores. Today they are no longer considered fungi, but have been placed in several supergroups on their own.

In British Columbia, we frequently encounter the more visible slime moulds--the plasmodial slime molds such as 'dog's vomit' (Fuligo septica). Plasmodial slime molds are really aggregates of individual flagellated cells that have fused together.

There is no confirmed list of slime mold species for British Columbia. However, a preliminary working list of reported species for BC has been prepared by Kent Brothers.

View a preliminary working list of the slime molds of British Columbia

In the gallery below, we provide a few photos of some of the commonly encountered types of slime molds in the Pacific Northwest. Thanks to Michael Beug and Terry Taylor for identifications, and insights into slime molds. Thanks also to May Kald and Michael Beug for lovely slime mold photos.


Lindbladia tabulina, photo by May Kald, identification by Michael Beug.


Dog's vomit (Fuligo septica), photo by May Kald, identification confirmed by Michael Beug/Terry Taylor.


Wolf's millk (Lycogala epidendrum), photo by May Kald, identification confirmed by Michael Beug/Terry Taylor.


Wolf's millk (Lycogala epidendrum), photo by May Kald, identification confirmed by Michael Beug/Terry Taylor.

Unidentified white slime mold, photo by May Kald.

Trichia c.f. decepiens, photo by Michael Beug.

Tubifera feruginosa, photo by Michael Beug

Tapioca slime (Brefeldlia maxima), a common spring slime mold, photo by Michael Beug.

 

Chocolate tube slime molds (Stemonitis sp.), photo by Michael Beug. Mature stage.


Chocolate tube slime mold (Stemonitis sp.), photo by May Kald. Immature stage. Identification by Michael Beug.

 

 

Recommended citation:  Author, date, page title. In: Klinkenberg, Brian. (Editor) 2017. E-Flora BC: Electronic Atlas of the Flora of British Columbia [eflora.bc.ca]. Lab for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. [Date Accessed]

E-Flora BC: An initiative of the Spatial Data Lab, Department of Geography UBC, and the UBC Herbarium.

© Copyright 2017 E-Flora BC.