FAMILIES OF DIPLURA OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

by

R. A. Cannings and G. G. E. Scudder 
Copyright © 2006 - All rights reserved.

Extracted from the forthcoming publication The Insect Families of British Columbia.
Draft 2003.

Key to Families of Diplura

1. Cerci multisegmented, long and filiform (Fig. D1) ..........................Campodeidae

- Cerci 1-segmented, short and modified to form strongly sclerotized forceps (Fig. D2) ...........................................................................................................2

2. Labial palps present; with 4 pairs of thoracic spiracles......................... Japygidae

- Labial palps absent; with 2 pairs of thoracic spiracles...................... Parajapygidae

 

Description of Families

Family CAMPODEIDAE

Members of this family are small, delicate and white with slender flattened bodies, long conspicuous antennae, and long many segmented cerci that are longer than the antennae. The first abdominal segment lacks styli, and there are only three pairs of spiracles, all on the thorax.

There is at least one native species of Campodeidae. It is evidently a species of Campodea, and has been found damaging lettuce seedlings in the Queen Charlotte Islands.

Family JAPYGIDAE

Slender, fragile hexapods with labial palps present. The abdomen terminates in short, 1-segmented sclerotized forceps. The thorax bears four pairs of spiracles.

The species Evalljapyx hubbardi Cook (=sonoranus Silvestri) is reported from Victoria, and an undescribed species of Evalljapyx occurs on Galiano Island and the Queen Charlotte Islands.

Family PARAJAPYGIDAE

Small, slender, fragile hexapods lacking labial palps. The antennae are without trichobothria. The abdomen terminates in short, 1-segment sclerotized forceps with a glandular orifice on the proximal dorsal surface. The thorax bears two pairs of spiracles, and lateral subcoxae appendages are present in both sexes. The genus Parajapyx occurs in British Columbia, but the species in undetermined.


Please cite these pages as:

Author, date, page title. In:   Klinkenberg, Brian. (Editor) 2017. E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Fauna of British Columbia [www.efauna.bc.ca]. Lab for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. [Date Accessed]

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