UNIT 66 - DATABASE CREATION

UNIT 66 - DATABASE CREATION

  • A. INTRODUCTION
  • B. DATABASE DESIGN
  • C. ISSUES IN DATABASE CREATION
  • D. KEY HARDWARE PARAMETERS
  • E. DATABASE REDEFINITION
  • F. TILES AND LAYERS
  • G. DATA CONVERSION
  • H. SCHEDULING DATABASE CREATION
  • I. EXAMPLE - FLATHEAD NATIONAL FOREST DATABASE
  • REFERENCES
  • EXAM AND DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
  • NOTES

    This unit is the longest one included in the Curriculum. It will be impossible to cover all this material in one lecture, but there is no clear break at which to split this cleanly. Some of the material is technical and some of it management oriented. You will have to decide what to omit, if you need to, based on your students' interests and educational backgrounds.

    UNIT 66 - DATABASE CREATION

    A. INTRODUCTION

    B. DATABASE DESIGN

    Stages in database design

    C. ISSUES IN DATABASE CREATION

    D. KEY HARDWARE PARAMETERS

    Volume

    Access speed

    Network configuration

    E. DATABASE REDEFINITION

    F. TILES AND LAYERS

    Reasons for partitioning

    "Seamless" databases

    Organizing data into layers

    Selecting tile configurations

    G. DATA CONVERSION

    Database requirements

    In-house conversion

    H. SCHEDULING DATABASE CREATION

    Scheduling issues

    I. EXAMPLE - FLATHEAD NATIONAL FOREST DATABASE

    Background

    Examples of products

    Proposed database contents

    Example dataset characteristics

    Tiling

    Database creation plan

    System specific issues

    Schedule

    REFERENCES

    ACSM-ASPRS GIMS Committee, 1989. "Multi-purpose Geographic Database Guidelines for Local Governments," ASCM Bulletin, Number 121:42-50. Provides a general outline for the consideration of scale and content for municipal GIS databases.

    Calkins, H.W., and D.F. Marble, 1987. "The transition to automated production cartography: design of the master cartographic database," The American Cartographer 14:105- 119. Stresses the need for rigorous database design and illustrates the use of the entity-relationship model for spatial databases.

    Nyerges, T.L., 1989. "Schema integration analysis for the development of GIS databases," International Journal of Geographical Information Systems 3:152-83. Describes methods for analyzing the differences and similarities between two or more databases

    Nyerges, T.L., and K.J. Dueker, 1988. "Geographic Information Systems in Transportation," US Department of Transportation, Washington, DC. Report describes the potential use of GIS in State Transportation offices and the types of data and functionality that would be required.

    Tomlinson Associates Inc., 1985. Advanced geographic information systems workloads analysis: Flathead National Forest individual forest report. Report to US Forest Service.

    EXAM AND DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

    1. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of distributed vs. centralized databases for resource management agencies.

    2. Most applications of GIS for resource management to date have been developed around a dedicated host, rather than sharing space on a general-purpose mainframe. In fact the development of minicomputers in the late 1970s gave a tremendous boost to GIS because it made dedicated computers available at costs which were within the range of many agencies. Why do GIS developers prefer a dedicated host? Are these arguments compatible with the idea of a database distributed over a network?

    3. Describe the functions of a Database Manager for a GIS installation.

    4. Despite the importance of design in GIS databases, there is remarkably little literature on the topic at this time. Why?

    5. The Caribou product for the Forest Service calls for information on elevation and aspect. What are the different sources and data models which could be used to provide this information? What effects might each choice have on the generation of the product?

    6. Suppose the Forest Service determined that its GIS would be implemented in query rather than product mode, i.e. it would train its managers to work directly with the database, instead of defining products for the system to generate. How would you go about identifying the input and output requirements of a query based system? What other items would be important in system planning?


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