UNIT 25 - TRENDS IN GIS

UNIT 25 - TRENDS IN GIS

Compiled with assistance from Jack Dangermond, ESRI

  • A. INTRODUCTION
  • B. HARDWARE
  • C. SOFTWARE
  • D. NEW APPLICATIONS OF GIS TECHNOLOGY
  • E. NEW SOURCES OF DATA
  • F. CONCLUSION
  • REFERENCES
  • DISCUSSION/EXAMINATION QUESTIONS
  • NOTES

    This unit reviews some of the current trends in GIS. This unit, in particular, will date very quickly. You will need to read the current trade magazines to see what the newest trends are.

    UNIT 25 - TRENDS IN GIS

    Compiled with assistance from Jack Dangermond, ESRI

    A. INTRODUCTION

    B. HARDWARE

    Fast geoprocessing

    Parallel Processing

    Memory

    Workstations

    Networks

    Hardware for specialized processing functions

    Operating systems

    Peripheral devices

    Specialized workstations

    C. SOFTWARE

    Database management systems

    Relational DBMSs

    DBMS versus Fourth Generation Languages

    GIS system integration

    Display products

    Interfaces to other technologies

    User interfaces

    D. NEW APPLICATIONS OF GIS TECHNOLOGY

    Modeling and decision support

    Sciences and mathematics

    E. NEW SOURCES OF DATA

    Remote sensing

    Error/uncertainty

    Data sharing

    F. CONCLUSION

    REFERENCES

    Dangermond, Jack and Morehouse, Scott. 1987. "Trends in Hardware for Geographic Information Systems," Proceedings AUTOCARTO 8, ASPRS/ACSM, Falls Church, VA. (Also available from ESRI)

    Dangermond, Jack, 1987. "Trends in Geographic Information Systems Software," Proceedings IGIS: The Research Agenda, NASA, Washington, DC. (Also available from ESRI)

    U.K. Department of the Environment, 1987. Handling Geographic Information, Report of the Committee of Enquiry chaired by Lord Chorley (the "Chorley Report"), Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London.

    DISCUSSION/EXAMINATION QUESTIONS

    1. Imagine a few important future developments which you believe ought to occur in GIS technology. Do they depend chiefly on hardware or software, or both? Explain.

    2. Select a particular discipline, field, or specialty to which you think GIS technology might be applied. Discuss some specific future applications and their implications for professional practice in that field. What specialized GIS features would these applications require?

    3. What are the characteristics of an "ideal" source of data for use in a GIS? List them and discuss each one. Now, are there any potential sources of GIS data which have not yet been utilized but which meet most of these criteria?

    4. Design a GIS workstation for the support of global science (i.e. the analysis and modeling of data for the entire globe). What operations, database models and user interface features would it have?


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