UNIT 16 - OUTPUT

UNIT 16 - OUTPUT

Compiled with assistance from Jeffrey L. Star, University of California at Santa Barbara

  • A. INTRODUCTION
  • B. TEXT OUTPUT
  • C. GRAPHIC OUTPUT
  • D. HARDCOPY OUTPUT
  • E. CRTS (CATHODE RAY TUBES)
  • F. GRAPHICS STANDARDS
  • REFERENCES
  • DISCUSSION AND EXAM QUESTIONS
  • NOTES 
  • This is another unit that could be placed in several different locations within an introductory course. We have chosen to place it here as it falls within the topic of Using the GIS. However, you may find several other places for it. This unit should be illustrated with several examples of hardcopy and possibly &QUOTsoft" output. Maps plotted by different types of plotters and printers would be especially useful. The slide set contains some examples of the hardware items described here.

    UNIT 16 - OUTPUT

    Compiled with assistance from Jeffrey L. Star, University of California at Santa Barbara

    A. INTRODUCTION

    Types of output B. TEXT OUTPUT Tables C. GRAPHIC OUTPUT

    Graphics peripherals

    Raster and vector devices D. HARDCOPY OUTPUT

    Line printers

    Dot matrix printers/plotters Pen plotters Optical scanners E. CRTS (CATHODE RAY TUBES) Storage tube technology Refresh image technology Color Bit planes and palettes 3-D display Memory and processing components F. GRAPHICS STANDARDS REFERENCES

    Maguire, D.J., 1989. Computers in Geography, Wiley, New York. A good general introduction to computer use and spatial data: chapters 5 and 11 have excellent reviews of hardware.

    DISCUSSION AND EXAM QUESTIONS

    1. Low-quality dot matrix printers use 9 hammer pins in a vertical column to create each line of print at 6 lines per inch, and thus achieve a resolution of about 50 dots per inch or 2 dots per mm. Compare the output of this device to the contents of the standard topographic map.

    2. Compare the desktop plotter and the color CRT screen as display devices. Which would you find more useful as a location analyst for a major retailer?

    3. Cartography is constrained by the two-dimensional nature of its paper medium. What new ways of displaying spatial data can you devise to take advantage of 3-D display capabilities?

    4. &QUOTRaster and vector are not only different approaches to constructing a picture, but fundamentally different ways of looking at the world". Discuss. 


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